Fight cancer with these resources

If you or a friend are battling cancer, check out the marvelous resources on my latest page addition to this site — Cancer-fighting information

Have a great cancer-fighting Internet site to suggest? Please let me know via the comment link below.

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Sleep more, weigh less?

Want to lose weight?   Perhaps you should get more sleep.

Researchers from Case Western University in Ohio monitored 70,000 women for over a 15-year period and determined that those getting five hours or less of sleep each night 30 percent more likely to gain weight than were those getting seven hours or more of sleep.

Light sleepers also have a significantly higher risk of becoming obese, according to the study supervised by Dr. S. Patel of the university.

What surprised the researchers was that sleeping patterns had a much greater influence on women’s long-term weight than eating habits or physical activity.

At the start of the study, the women who slept up to five hours a night weighed 5.4 pounds more than those who got 7 hours or more. They also put on 1.6 pounds more each year than the good sleepers. [Read more...]

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Key health care reform? Cut obesity

By Karen Pallarito
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 — A diverse alliance of payer, provider and consumer organizations, girded by two former U.S. Surgeons General, on Wednesday urged policymakers to address the nation’s obesity epidemic as part of federal health care reform legislation.

Former Surgeon General Dr. David Satcher, whose 2001 report on obesity recognized the problem as an “epidemic,” emphasized the need to invest in health promotion and disease prevention, particularly for the health of the nation’s youth.

“We are in essence addicting our children to sedentary lifestyles; we’re addicting them to high-salt, high-sweet, high-fat diets,” he said, “and then we pay for it later on when they come to us with cancer, heart disease, [and] diabetes.” [Read more...]

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Pass this quiz for a longer life

chicken wrap
Heart Healthy Quiz: How Much Do You Know?

1. Which of the following foods is not specifically linked to a reduced risk of heart disease?
a. Garlic
b. Oats
c. Corn
d. Grape juice
e. Nuts

2. The fiber in which of the following foods will lead to a reduction of blood cholesterol?
a. Whole-grain bread
b. Brown rice
c. Bran cereal
d. Carrots
e. Oats

3. What percentage of total deaths in the United States is linked to heart disease?
a. 20%
b. 30%
c. 40%
d. 50%
e. 60% [Read more...]

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‘Supersize me!’ – a major wake-up call

Few movies have opened as many eyes about health habits as has the movie Supersize me! I’ve encouraged many people to watch this frightening account of a young man who ate nothing but fast food for 30 days and nearly died.

I continue to be shocked at the number of people who eat poor-quality fast food, seemingly oblivious to the fact that years of life expectancy are likely melting away as they consume grease-laden, salt-permeated and synthetics-laced food.

You can watch the movie in the YouTube window below. Please encourage others to watch this movie. Perhaps some will change their eating habits and enjoy longer lives as a result.
YouTube Preview Image

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Sour news about too much sugar

For research documentation, click here

DALLAS (Associated Press)– A spoonful of sugar? Americans are swallowing 22 teaspoons of sugar each day, and it’s time to cut way back, the American Heart Association says.

Most of that added sugar comes from soft drinks and candy — a whopping 355 calories and the equivalent of guzzling two cans of soda and eating a chocolate bar.

By comparison, most women should be getting no more than 6 teaspoons a day, or 100 calories, of added sugar — the sweeteners and syrups that are added to foods during processing, preparation or at the table. For most men, the recommended limit is 9 teaspoons, or 150 calories, the heart group says.
[Read more...]

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Study: weight gain shrinks brain

A new article reports that obese people have 8 percent less brain tissue than normal-weight individuals. Their brains look 16 years older than the brains of lean individuals, researchers said.

Those classified as overweight have 4 percent less brain tissue and their brains appear to have aged prematurely by eight years.

The results, based on brain scans of 94 people in their 70s, represent “severe brain degeneration,” said Paul Thompson, senior author of the study and a UCLA professor of neurology.

“That’s a big loss of tissue and it depletes your cognitive reserves, putting you at much greater risk of Alzheimer’s and other diseases that attack the brain,” said Thompson. “But you can greatly reduce your risk for Alzheimer’s, if you can eat healthily and keep your weight under control.” [Read more...]

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Help others stop ‘waisting’ away

Consider these facts:

  • Rampant diabetes that shows no sign of diminishing but, in fact, continued explosive growth.
  • Heart problems related to the myriad of stresses placed on the body because of so many people being far overweight.
  • Orthopedic problems with lower extremities because of stress upon joints from inordinate amounts of pressure on hips, knees, ankles and feet.

This list of health complications often associated with obesity just keeps going.

Those struggling with weight gain need encouragement, not condemnation.  Convey a concern for their general health and a willingness to celebrate even the smallest of weight losses.

There is too much at stake to ignore the weight-challenged.

With your help, a life might be changed

To open or save the Trends in Obesity Powerpoint slideshow prepared by the Center for Disease Control, click map
Click on map to watch ominous spreading of obesity

To view the slideshow and obesity rates by ethnicity, right click here and open page in new window

Obesity Trends 2008

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How to lower ‘fridge’ fever

How serious of a health threat is the wave of obesity flooding America from the inside out? Click on the image below or on the link below and watch a video trailer that might erase any complacency you have toward the idea of overeating.

obesity as killer thumbnail for videoclick here for video

If you’ve been struggling with moving toward a healthier body weight, contact Lori today to learn how you can transform hope for a better life into reality.

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Recommendations for cancer prevention

The American Institute of Cancer Research has offered the following advice for reducing cancer occurrence, based on the 2007 findings of WCRF/AICR’s expert report, Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity, and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective.

1. Be as lean as possible without becoming underweight.

2. Be physically active for at least 30 minutes every day.

3. Avoid sugary drinks. Limit consumption of energy dense foods (particularly processed foods high in added sugar, or low in fiber, or high in fat).

4. Eat more of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes such as beans.

[Read more...]

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