Good health should begin in youth

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The friendly side of certain fats

The guidelines for fat intake are that we consume no more than 20 – 35 % of calories from fat.

A little fat in food adds more than flavor to your meal. It also helps satisfy your hunger by making you feel full after eating. Why? Because fats take longer to leave your stomach than either carbohydrates or proteins do.
 

A certain amount of body fat serves several functions: to cushion and position your body organs, to protect your bones from injury and to form a layer under your skin. This fat layer offers insulation, helping you stay warm. And the soft fat pads on your buttocks and the palms of your hands protect your bones from bumps, bangs and jolts.  A VERY useful chart follows so make sure to read the rest of this article. [Read more...]

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Sludge in your tank?

By Lori Drummond, R.D., L.D.
GoodHealthConsulting LLC founder

Do you have sludge in your tank?

Sludge…in the gallbladder, that is?

The gall bladder is our holding tank for bile.

Gallbladder sludge, a/k/a, biliary sludge, is “a common term that is applied to an abnormality of bile … of the gallbladder.” Specifically, the bile within the gallbladder contains microscopic particles, usually cholesterol or pigment, embedded in mucus secreted by the gallbladder. Over time, sludge may remain in the gallbladder, it may disappear and not return, or it may come and go.” (Medicinenet.com)

Ever wonder if you have sludge? Or gallstones? [Read more...]

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Don’t fall for those ’shortcut’ diets

by Holly Robinson Peete, Shine staff

You’ve heard about them in email forwards and late-night infomercials, but these five “miracle diets” just plain don’t work. From straight-up starvation to a steady diet of boiled cabbage, here are diets to steer clear of:

#1 The Grapefruit Diet

The claim is that eating grapefruit with protein triggers a “magical” fat burning process. We’re always wary of the word “magic” in regards to a diet, and this one is no exception. While grapefruit is loaded with vitamin C and fiber and is a great way to start your morning, there’s no evidence to support its reputation as a “fat-burner.”

#2 Juice Diets

While a liquid diet has the potential to starve your body into shedding excess pounds, a super low-calorie diet like this one kicks your metabolism into survival mode. Unsure where the next meal is coming from, your body hangs on to the nutrients it has, slowing your metabolism, and burning fewer calories overall. The minute you switch back to solid foods, there’s a good chance those pounds will “magically” reappear. [Read more...]

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National Nutrition Month

National Nutrition Month® is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the American Dietetic Association. The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

Registered Dietitian Day, also celebrated in March, increases awareness of registered dietitians as the indispensable providers of food and nutrition services and recognizes RDs for their commitment to helping people enjoy healthy lives.

Below are three videos to help you toward better nutrition and, ultimately, toward better health.









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The whole grain truth

In my business, I see a lot of diabetics or folks that just want to lose weight and want to know the best foods to eat. When it comes to grains, I always let them know that the less processed the better because whole grains provide more nutrients such as vitamins, minerals plus more fiber than ground grains. The following is an excellent article explaining the digestive benefits of whole grains — Lori

By Diana Mirkin
co-author of The Whole Grains Cookbook

When grains are processed into flour or cereals, the primary concern is loss of nutrients. However, if you grind your own grains or use products that are made from the whole grain without discarding anything, you get all or most of the nutrients of the original grain. But grains that have been broken apart in any way will be digested quicker. That’s a big disadvantage for diabetics and dieters.

Carbohydrates are long chains of sugars, and only single sugars can be absorbed from your intestines into your bloodstream. The foods that cause rapid rise in blood sugar are those that are digested most quickly; the worst offenders are sugar and anything made from flour.

When you eat whole grains (seeds), it takes a long time to break apart the capsule, separate the carbohydrates from the fiber, and completely digest each grain. Your blood sugar rises slowly, stays slightly elevated for a long time (so you don’t feel hungry again soon after eating) and never reaches the high levels that come from sugar or flour. [Read more...]

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The Coffee Connoisseur’s question

I’m often asked if coffee is harmful or good for you. From my recent survey of some the latest research, coffee isn’t as harmful as once thought and can actually have some healthful benefits.

I’ve been a coffee drinker since my early 20s. I’ve typically enjoyed one or two cups a day with an occasional cup in the afternoon or evening for a pick-me-up. You coffee connoisseurs know what I’m talking about.

There have also been seasons where I stopped drinking coffee and decided to drink only herbal teas in order to reap their benefit. The point was to give my body a break from the caffeine. I have not discerned any noticeable difference in my level alertness or general health, however. I’m sure some would beg to differ.

Coffee has been found to have the B-vitamin niacin, magnesium, and is a rich source of antioxidants. (Manach, et al 2004) It is well known that antioxidants fight the harmful effects of free radicals and the cell damage they cause.

In a study by Dogasaki et al (2002), they found that brewed coffee possessed antibacterial activities exhibited by certain acids such as caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid. In a recent meta-analysis regarding coffee consumption and risk of coronary heart disease, the researchers concluded that their findings did not support the hypothesis that drinking coffee increases the long-term risk of heart disease.

They also found that coffee consumption in moderation was associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease in women. (Jiang-nan, et al 2009). [Read more...]

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Living lazy = living large

Teen Obesity: Lack of Exercise May Not Be to Blame
By Alice Park of TIME magazine

You don’t have to spend much time with teenagers to know that the average adolescent would rather devote an afternoon to sitting in front of the TV, computer or video-game console than working out in a gym. And in recent years, as physical-education classes have been progressively cut from cash-strapped public-school curriculums, teens have had even more time to lounge, slouch, hang out or do anything but break a sweat.

It’s no surprise, then, that obesity rates among U.S. youngsters have skyrocketed, tripling from 1976 to 2004. Public-health experts and obesity researchers attribute the trend in part to kids’ increasingly sedentary lifestyles. As teens spend more and more time anchored before a screen — burning fewer and fewer calories each day — they’re storing more of that unused energy as fat. Hence, the ballooning rates of obesity. (See TIME’s video “Obesity and Social Networks.”) [Read more...]

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The facts are in: better diet limits cancer

Cancer is becoming more prevalent in our society. You’ve not just read about it, but you’ve seen it among those you know or perhaps experienced it yourself.

It’s tough news to hear even in the best of circumstances. But this article might provide a boost to your commitment to battle the affliction, whether personally or vicariously  –  Lori Drummond, R.D., L.D..

Dr. Dean Ornish and other research physicians recently published a randomized controlled trial showing that the progression of early-stage prostate cancer may be stopped or perhaps even reversed by making similar changes in diet and lifestyle.

This was the first randomized controlled trial showing that the progression of any type of cancer may be modified just by changing what we eat and how we live. What’s true for prostate cancer may be true for breast cancer as well.

Recent studies by the Preventive Medicine Research Institute continue to show how dynamically lifestyle changes can improve our health and well-being, even on a genetic and cellular level. [Read more...]

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Study: Processed food feeds depression

Can healthy eating habits combat depression? According to recent research from the University College London it’s very possible.

Many people eat diets that are high in fat, but are comprised mainly of trans fat or saturated fat from fried or fast foods. Not good, says Dr. Martinez-Gonzalez.

“The membranes of our neurons are composed of fat, so the quality of fat that you are eating definitely has an influence on the quality of the neuron membranes, and the body’s synthesis of neurotransmitters is dependent on the vitamins you’re eating,” Martinez-Gonzalez said.

It’s important to eat fats, but choosing the right type of fats is key. In simple language, fats are essential for the utilization of vitamins that assist with proper brain function. Our brains use fatty acids from fat to create the specialized cells that help us to think and feel.

We need a balance of fats so that our diets are comprised of 20% of total fats, with only 10% of total fat coming from the saturated kind like milk, coconut oil, butter or fats that are solid at room temperature. (Read more by Lori on this topic after the article below).

LONDON (AFP) – A diet heavy in processed and fatty foods increases the risk of depression, according to British research published on Monday.

Researchers at University College London also found that a diet including plenty of fresh vegetables, fruit and fish could help prevent the onset of depression. [Read more...]

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