Can we starve cancer?

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Cooking research helps limit cancer

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American Institute of Cancer Research

The American Institute of Cancer Research is doing some wonderful cooking research in order to blend flavors and nutrition in a way that feed the desire for good taste while at the same time increasingly starving the cancer cells within the body.

Enjoy this dietitian-endorsed recipe…

Tuscan Chickpea Soup

* 2 cans (15 oz.) chickpeas, rinsed and drained
* 2 large whole garlic cloves, peeled
* 1 can (14 1/4 oz.) reduced-sodium vegetable broth
* 2 tsp. extra-virgin olive oil
* 2 cups water
* 1 medium onion, chopped
* 2 Tbsp. tomato paste
* 1 tsp. chopped fresh rosemary
* Salt and freshly ground black pepper
* 2 tsp. extra-virgin olive oil, for garnish (optional)
* 1 tsp. lemon juice (optional)
* 2 1/2 Tbsp. minced flat-leaf parsley, for garnish (optional)

Place chickpeas and garlic in large saucepan. Pour broth and 2 cups cold water into pot. Add liquid to pot and over medium-high heat, bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, until beans are very soft, 20 minutes. Let the soup sit 10 minutes to cool slightly.

Meanwhile, heat oil in small skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and cook, stirring often, until onion is soft, about 5 minutes. Transfer mixture to blender.

Add chickpeas, garlic, liquid, tomato paste and rosemary. Purée until smooth. This may need to be done in 2 batches. Make soup smooth or leave some texture, as you prefer. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

To serve, ladle soup into bowls. Garnish each either by drizzling 1/2-teaspoon of olive oil over the soup, or by mixing in 1 teaspoon lemon juice. Sprinkle with parsley.

Makes 6 servings or 6 cups.

Per serving: 142 calories, 3 g. total fat (less than 1 g. saturated fat), 21 g. carbohydrate,
8 g. protein, 5 g. dietary fiber, 372 mg. sodium.

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Diabetes rate to double, costs to triple

WASHINGTON (AFP) – The number of Americans with diabetes will nearly double over the next 25 years, rising from 23.7 million in 2009 to 44.1 million in 2034, according to a study by the University of Chicago.

In the same period, medical costs associated with treating the disease will triple from 113 billion dollars to 336 billion dollars, even without a rise in the incidence of obesity, according to the study published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

“If we don’t change our diet and exercise habits or find new, more effective and less expensive ways to prevent and treat diabetes, we will find ourselves in a lot of trouble as a population,” said lead author Elbert Huang.

The study said its projections, despite being significantly higher than other recent estimates, may be too conservative because they assume the rate of diabetes and obesity, a risk factor for the disease, will remain stable. [Read more...]

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The facts are in: better diet limits cancer

Cancer is becoming more prevalent in our society. You’ve not just read about it, but you’ve seen it among those you know or perhaps experienced it yourself.

It’s tough news to hear even in the best of circumstances. But this article might provide a boost to your commitment to battle the affliction, whether personally or vicariously  –  Lori Drummond, R.D., L.D..

Dr. Dean Ornish and other research physicians recently published a randomized controlled trial showing that the progression of early-stage prostate cancer may be stopped or perhaps even reversed by making similar changes in diet and lifestyle.

This was the first randomized controlled trial showing that the progression of any type of cancer may be modified just by changing what we eat and how we live. What’s true for prostate cancer may be true for breast cancer as well.

Recent studies by the Preventive Medicine Research Institute continue to show how dynamically lifestyle changes can improve our health and well-being, even on a genetic and cellular level. [Read more...]

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Study: Processed food feeds depression

Can healthy eating habits combat depression? According to recent research from the University College London it’s very possible.

Many people eat diets that are high in fat, but are comprised mainly of trans fat or saturated fat from fried or fast foods. Not good, says Dr. Martinez-Gonzalez.

“The membranes of our neurons are composed of fat, so the quality of fat that you are eating definitely has an influence on the quality of the neuron membranes, and the body’s synthesis of neurotransmitters is dependent on the vitamins you’re eating,” Martinez-Gonzalez said.

It’s important to eat fats, but choosing the right type of fats is key. In simple language, fats are essential for the utilization of vitamins that assist with proper brain function. Our brains use fatty acids from fat to create the specialized cells that help us to think and feel.

We need a balance of fats so that our diets are comprised of 20% of total fats, with only 10% of total fat coming from the saturated kind like milk, coconut oil, butter or fats that are solid at room temperature. (Read more by Lori on this topic after the article below).

LONDON (AFP) – A diet heavy in processed and fatty foods increases the risk of depression, according to British research published on Monday.

Researchers at University College London also found that a diet including plenty of fresh vegetables, fruit and fish could help prevent the onset of depression. [Read more...]

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Fight cancer with these resources

If you or a friend are battling cancer, check out the marvelous resources on my latest page addition to this site — Cancer-fighting information

Have a great cancer-fighting Internet site to suggest? Please let me know via the comment link below.

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Sour news about too much sugar

For research documentation, click here

DALLAS (Associated Press)– A spoonful of sugar? Americans are swallowing 22 teaspoons of sugar each day, and it’s time to cut way back, the American Heart Association says.

Most of that added sugar comes from soft drinks and candy — a whopping 355 calories and the equivalent of guzzling two cans of soda and eating a chocolate bar.

By comparison, most women should be getting no more than 6 teaspoons a day, or 100 calories, of added sugar — the sweeteners and syrups that are added to foods during processing, preparation or at the table. For most men, the recommended limit is 9 teaspoons, or 150 calories, the heart group says.
[Read more...]

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Help others stop ‘waisting’ away

Consider these facts:

  • Rampant diabetes that shows no sign of diminishing but, in fact, continued explosive growth.
  • Heart problems related to the myriad of stresses placed on the body because of so many people being far overweight.
  • Orthopedic problems with lower extremities because of stress upon joints from inordinate amounts of pressure on hips, knees, ankles and feet.

This list of health complications often associated with obesity just keeps going.

Those struggling with weight gain need encouragement, not condemnation.  Convey a concern for their general health and a willingness to celebrate even the smallest of weight losses.

There is too much at stake to ignore the weight-challenged.

With your help, a life might be changed

To open or save the Trends in Obesity Powerpoint slideshow prepared by the Center for Disease Control, click map
Click on map to watch ominous spreading of obesity

To view the slideshow and obesity rates by ethnicity, right click here and open page in new window

Obesity Trends 2008

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Recommendations for cancer prevention

The American Institute of Cancer Research has offered the following advice for reducing cancer occurrence, based on the 2007 findings of WCRF/AICR’s expert report, Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity, and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective.

1. Be as lean as possible without becoming underweight.

2. Be physically active for at least 30 minutes every day.

3. Avoid sugary drinks. Limit consumption of energy dense foods (particularly processed foods high in added sugar, or low in fiber, or high in fat).

4. Eat more of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes such as beans.

[Read more...]

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